Interactive symposium

The transformative potentials of our self-studies for a new epistemology of educational enquiry in our university

This interactive symposium is part of the Educational Studies of Ireland Conference

Celebrating Educational Research in Ireland: Retrospect and Prospect March 2005

This account of the symposium aims to give you access to the ideas that informed the symposium and to the papers. It also encourages you to take part in a discussion forum about the papers and their significance for debates on educational research and theory.

Symposium abstract

In this interactive symposium, we aim to demonstrate the transformative potentials of our self-studies for a new epistemology of educational enquiry in our university. We explain how we have improved our learning by working as a study group, how we transfer our learning to our school-based pedagogical practices, and how we are contributing to current debates in the literature on the significance of teacher research for educational enquiry (Snow 2001).

We are five PhD candidates and their supervisor, undertaking our self-studies through action research. Each of us aims to generate our personal theories of education about how we are contributing to the education of one another, and others in our own settings. Each asks, ‘How do I improve my learning to help you to learn?’ Each holds herself accountable for her influence in the Other’s learning. This focus on personal accountability places our work within an emerging tradition of a new scholarship of educational enquiry (Whitehead 1999), which has considerable potentials for new pedagogies and for the education of social formations in our university. We claim that accepting responsibility for our influence in the Other’s learning has enabled us to develop a form of individual and collective practice that demonstrates the highest quality of scholarly activity, while grounded in each person’s capacity to care for the other. By making our accounts public we believe we are setting precedents for forms of professional learning and institutional pedagogies (Schön 2005) from which others can learn how to improve their own practice and learning.

This symposium is an opportunity to test our claims against the critical judgement of peers. Through our oral and multi-media accounts, we hope to show how we are improving learning, in all the contexts of our professional lives.

References

Schön, D. (1995) ‘Knowing-in-action: The new scholarship requires a new epistemology’, Change, November–December: 27–34.

Snow, C. (2001) ‘Knowing What We Know: Children, Teachers, Researchers’, Educational Researcher, 30(7): 3–9. Presidential Address to the American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting, Seattle.

Whitehead, J. (1999) How do I improve my practice? Creating a New Discipline of Educational Enquiry. PhD Thesis, University of Bath

Participants

Jean McNiff (chair)

Máirín Glenn

Patricia Mannix McNamara

Caitríona McDonagh

Mary Roche

Bernie Sullivan

Biographies of participants

Máirín Glenn is a primary teacher in Co. Mayo. For her doctoral studies she is investigating the significance of interconnecting branching networks of communication for educational enquiry using multi-media forms of technology.

Patricia Mannix McNamara is a lecture in psychology and SPHE at the University of Limerick. Her doctoral studies include an investigation into the significance of Bernstein's theory of the pedagogisation of knowledge for educational practices and educational enquiry.

Caitríona McDonagh is a primary teacher in Co. Dublin. Her doctoral studies focus on the creation of new theories of learning difference and their significance for educational practices.

Jean McNiff is adjunct professor in the College of Education, University of Limerick. She has published widely on the significance of practitioners’ action enquiries for reconceptualising educational theory and its implications for educational practices.

Mary Roche is a primary teacher in Cork and is currently engaged in doctoral studies in the area of philosophical enquiry with children and its significance for a new scholarship of educational enquiry.

Bernie Sullivan works in a primary school in Dublin. She is a Resource Teacher for Travellers. She is passionately committed to social justice and equality, and takes as the focus of her doctoral enquiries how the creation of practical theories of justice that are grounded in democratic forms of schooling and equitable educational provision can contribute to new forms of educational practices and theory.

Papers:

What's New

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VALUE AND VIRTUE IN PRACTICE-BASED RESEARCH (2013) EDITED BY JEAN MCNIFF, DORSET, SEPTEMBER BOOKS.

THIS BOOK IS AVAILABLE FOR FREE DOWNLOAD. 

JEAN MCNIFF'S (2010) ACTION RESEARCH FOR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT: CONCISE ADVICE FOR NEW (AND EXPERIENCED) ACTION RESEARCHERS. DORSET, SEPTEMBER BOOKS. PLEASE GO TO WWW.SEPTEMBER-BOOKS.COM FOR FURTHER INFORMATION. 

THIS BOOK IS A BRAND NEW PRODUCTION AND HAS LOTS OF EXAMPLES, EXERCISES AND REALLY PRACTICAL ADVICE THAT ENGAGES WITH FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT ACTION RESEARCH. IT GIVES A CONCISE THEORETICAL OVERVIEW FOR ACTION RESEARCH AS WELL AS OUTLINING ITS HISTORICAL ROOTS. I HOPE YOU ENJOY IT!

Go to www.september-books.com to order and to see further information about the book and its contents. 

September Books

Conferences

 

Read about the Value and Virtue in Practice-Based Research conference at York St John University, Tuesday 9th and Wednesday 10th June 2015. Go to www.yorksj.ac.uk/value&virtue for further information.
Keynote speakers: Dr Tina Cook, Northumbria University

Professor Carol Munn-Giddings, Anglia Ruskin University


Professor Julian Stern, York St John University


Professor Jean McNiff, York St John University

 

 

 

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